Texas-Style Chili

When it’s time to think about putting on a pot of homemade chili, this is the first one to enter my mind! This is Paula Deen’s recipe and it is the only one that I have truly enjoyed, that has beans in it. I’m normally a strict, Texas chili, and all chili for that matter, needs zero beans. Zip. Nada. NONE. No beans. BUT…..I love this concoction with them! Even though the name of this recipe kind of bothers me, since I firmly believe that Texas chili has no beans, who am I to change the name of one of Paula’s recipes?? Nope. Not me. Paula is the Queen! Regardless of the bean dilemma, this recipe is absolutely delicious!! It’s cold outside. Let’s make some!

3 pounds ground chuck
1 pound hot bulk sausage
3 medium onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup chili powder
2 T. all-purpose flour
1 T. sugar
1 T. dried oregano
1 tsp. salt
2 (28 oz.) cans whole tomatoes, chopped with kitchen shears inside the can, with their juice
3 (16 oz.) cans Bush’s hot chili beans, drained

Combine the ground chuck, sausage, onions, and garlic in a Dutch oven. Cook over medium heat until the meat is browned; stir the meat to break it up as it cooks. Drain off the pan drippings. Stir in chili powder, flour, sugar, oregano, and salt, and mix well. (Here I add a little liquid of some sort. The recipe doesn’t call for it, but it makes me nervous to cook it like that for very long, for fear of some major scalding. Not that it would, it’s just something I’m not willing to try. Ha. So, a little red wine, juice from the canned beans, water, or beef broth are some suggestions, if you feel it needs some liquid too.)

Cover, and simmer for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Add the tomatoes and beans, and simmer for 20 minutes longer. Adjust seasonings and serve with crackers, chopped green onions, and cheese.

*I like to add salt to the meat while it is cooking even if the recipe doesn’t call for it. I feel like it gives meat the best flavor, at the best time, rather than salting afterwards.
Also, the left over chili is great for topping baked potatoes, french fries, tater tots, fritos, and even corn casseroles.

Makes about 5 Quarts

COOKING THE BOOKS, YA’LL!

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